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Adventure In A BOX: Day 4 Paia to North of Honolua Bay April 11, 2014

Paia town isn’t board of surfing.

Paia town isn’t board of surfing.

Day 4

After hiding from the rain for the night, I awoke to stormy clouds but it wasn’t raining!  I looked at some NOAA weather models for the day, and it looked like I was going to get wet.  Most likely really wet.  So I bought some zip lock bags as extra insurance that all my gear would stay dry and after a couple quick stops got back on the road.

day4My planned route is essentially a figure-eight of the island and it’s two volcanic masses with connecting isthmus, and this leg passed through Kahului before connecting with highway 340 going counterclockwise around the west side of the island.

The type of character that makes this town so great.  Locally made items for sale, and a unique alternative to mass production.

The type of character that makes this town so great. Locally made items for sale, and a unique alternative to mass production.

Don’t hassle the Hoff.  Baldwin beach, and the idyllic palm you’ve been waiting for.

Don’t hassle the Hoff. Baldwin beach, and the idyllic palm you’ve been waiting for.

This deserved a stop.

This deserved a stop.

It’s a funny feeling looking at the weather you are pedaling into and knowing you are willingly heading head first into a cataclysmic rain event.  The first wall of rain hit me by surprise when I was shooting a photo during a “it’s only sprinkling” sucker hole, and like actually believing anything a political puppet tells you, it was a shame on me moment that left me scrambling to put away my camera and batten down the hatches for the elements of what today was going to entail.

New directions sans Civ.

New directions sans Civ.

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Signs of the times.

Signs of the times.

Ireland with a warm ocean?

Ireland with a warm ocean?

Bianary code rejoice, no silver halide was harmed in the making of this photograph.

Bianary code rejoice, no silver halide was harmed in the making of this photograph.

Luckily it wasn’t all torrential rain, and I had a few breaks in the weather around picturesque Kahakuloa, with it’s dramatic windward landscape and the few stands selling banana bread on the side of the road.

The wheels in motion.

The wheels in motion.

Bike.  Sick of it yet?

Bike. Sick of it yet?

Looking over the shoulder at the scenery below.

Looking over the shoulder at the scenery below.

This is my kind of highway.  I hadn’t seen a car for an hour.

This is my kind of highway. I hadn’t seen a car for an hour.

This was a great road and felt light years away from the wizzing traffic and stoplights of Kahului. In between rain I enjoyed the view, and the narrow winding road cut into the rocky bluff hillside which wove its way through the numerous drainages that have been created via the combination of time and the perseverance of water.  The area is absolutely stunning, and the unstable weather added to the dramatic views that stretched out in front of me.

Looking towards the ocean, and the folding contours of the drainage leading into it.

Looking towards the ocean, and the folding contours of the drainage leading into it.

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Kahakuloa head in the background.  You can definitely scramble up this thing.

Kahakuloa head in the background. You can definitely scramble up this thing.

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A brief break in the rain.  no complaints.

A brief break in the rain. no complaints.

The route is jaw dropping at times.

The route is jaw dropping at times.

Lucky

Lucky

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Slipping around the corners.

Slipping around the corners.

I started looking for camp about 10 or so miles before Honolua Bay.  With dark approaching, being in a steep, exposed, area it wasn’t ideal camping conditions.  And the clouds looked like it was going to be a wet night.  Taking stock of what I saw, a sense of urgency started to creep into the situations.  Then I felt a drop.  I knew the clouds were about to unleash.  With the exposed landscape, I started looking and considering other options, checking under bridge support beams, looking for some solace from the impeding storm.

…and we have rain, mud, rocks, and a goat in the route.

…and we have rain, mud, rocks, and a goat in the route.

From Maui, with love.

From Maui, with love.

When worlds collide.

When worlds collide.

With 15 minutes till dark, I saw a sliver of a tin roof up a dirt road.  Took the turn to recon, and couldn’t believe what I saw:  a hunter check station with an overhang out of the wind, and a platform big enough to lay down the sleeping bag and reflector.  Jackpot.  I could have set the tarp as a wall from roof to platform, but seeing the conditions felt better laying on it so I could burrito up in it bivy sack style if winds changed.  No need.  It rained hard and I was dry.  I think that’s part of why I like this kind of travel so much.  It strips away a lot of the frivolous mumbo jumbo that it’s hard to not get caught up in, and is a great barometer for perspective to appreciate the little things.

This kind of bivouac is kind of like winning the lottery.

This kind of bivouac is kind of like winning the lottery.